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Travel

TRAVEL: A QUICK GUIDE TO SARDINIA

As you probably know from a sneak peek of the photos I posted here, I was utterly blown away by my recent trip to Sardinia, I had never been to anywhere so simple and yet gob smacking. Rather than this being a definitive guide to the island – it’s actually HUGE fyi – I thought I would give you an overview of the road trip we did while we were there. Sadly time didn’t allow us to see the whole island, but if you’re looking for an itinerary I highly suggest this one, as from what I can see you get the best of both sides of the coast whilst not spending too much time in the busy, touristy areas.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Make sure to check out my quick google map of the trip here to get you bearings.

Day 1

We flew into Olbia airport from Gatwick and hired a car straight away for the whole week. One thing we wanted to avoid was any area that was overly developed or touristy, so instead of going North to the (from what I’ve read) glitzy Costa Esmerelda we headed south to the Golfo Di Orosei and stayed here. The village of Santa Maria Navaresse that we randomly chose to stay was so gorgeous and simple – virtually no tourists and the sweetest little beach with a tree covered bar overlooking the water, where we would go for drinks in the early evening and watch the sun set.

Day 2

We hired a simple rhib boat in the Marina (from these guys if you’re interested) and took it up the coast for a whole day, which was the most memorable part of the trip – it’s a MUST. Surprisingly the cost of hiring a private boat was almost the same as the combined cost of the two of us going on a tour (around 120 euros for the day), without the hassle of dealing with other people and the feeling of being fully scheduled. Luckily Ben has experience driving a boat, but even if you don’t it seemed like coast isn’t that busy (oh and you don’t need a license – love Italy!). If hiring a boat is too daunting for you, try to get on a tour with the least number of people possible. We took lots of yummy italian deli food along with us like salami, artichokes, and a delicious (virtually free) bottle of red wine and had the most magical day – for two pragmatic and generally unromantic people I have to say we were quite smitten with the beauty and being there together… And that water colour - no words! Our favourite beach was Cala Luna with its white shores and caves and we stopped there for a few hours in the afternoon.

Day 3

We drove the winding road between Santa Maria Navaresse and Dorgali, which gives an amazing view of the hinterland valleys and mountains, you can stop in Baunei or Nuoro to get an feel for the sweet local villages (where there are lots of leather shops!).On our way back, just by chance, we then stumbled upon heaven. Because the  Golfo di Orosei has a national park running along the coast, it’s quite difficult to access all the amazing beaches unless you do a long hike or go by boat. However, just by chance we took a side road and wound down the cliffs until we got to deserted Pedra Longa, finding ourselves in one of the few places you can reach the water in a car. There was a little cliff side trattoria and a track that went down to the most amazing rocky bay, perfect for swimming and general lounging. We finished up with dinner here which was kinda of a modernised agrotourismo (which is traditionally kind of like a farm stay with great food), I loved the courtyard.

Day 4 

On the fourth day we swapped sides of the coast, driving through the middle of the island and visiting a few villages on the way – Orogosolo (famous for streets covered in murals and graffiti) and Gavoi (pretty town known for it’s literary festival with this place to eat delicious homemade pasta). We then landed in the picture perfect town of Bosa at our hotel - although the rooms were basic we were lucky to stay in the part of the hotel overlooking the riverfront which was such a lovely way to wake up. In the afternoon we toured the beaches to the north of Bosa, finding some gorgeous hidden coves.

Day 5

We did a day trip from Bosa to the town of Alghero which seemed to be where most people stay when they come so was a bit busier and a little more touristy than Bosa (they have very pretty streets though). We had lunch on the ramparts of the town’s fortified wall overlooking the ocean and wandered the streets, topping it all off with some gelato. We headed back in time for dinner in Bosa.

Day 6

On our last day we travelled back across the island to La Cinta beach near San Teodoro for one last lay in the sun before our flight back to London. The beach was beautiful but so incredibly busy, it was literally heaving, which was a great reminder that we had chosen the right approach by staying out of the busier and more accessible areas.

Trip to sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

We loved everything about our little village of Santa Maria Navaresse, including this beach.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

We took turns driving… Wearing: Club Monaco top (similar to this dress).

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

And spent a few hours here at Cala Genone bobbing around.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Didn’t really want to leave.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Loved everything about Cala Goloritze, one of the nicest beaches along the coastline. Apparently you can hike here along the coast, which is a good option if a boat isn’t for you.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Believe me I didn’t want to leave.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

We found this secret cove just north of Santa Maria Navaresse, could have spent all day here!

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

The freedom of having our own small boat was priceless.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

That fabric sail is just crying out to be DIYed.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

We had an admittedly average meal of paninis here, but the view helped!

Trip to sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

We hiked the hills (tried to visit So Gorrupu canyons but the weather turned wet so we had to go back halfway).

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

This was our ‘secret’ spot at Pedra Longa. Seriously there is no filter involved here, the sea is really just that colour.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Climbers camoflaging amongst the rocks.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Discovering inland Sardinia – such interesting and diverse landscapes.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

We stopped for a spot of shopping in Nuoro

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

The men of Nuoro

Trip to sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Had dinner at Su Gologone

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.comnia24

Wandered the hot midday streets of Orgosolo. Wearing: Club Monaco top and shorts, J Crew bag, sandals and Panama

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Saw so many interesting murals and graffiti in Orgosolo. I was surprised by the number of  which  were very globally focused, given the village is in such an isolated hilltop spot (totes no wifi there).

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Enjoyed the quiet lanes in hilltop villages.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Orgosolo

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Had handmade pasta for lunch at Santa Rough in Gavoi

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

And over on the west coast, we wandered through beautiful fields…

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

To discover this beach.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Strolled the streets at twilight in Bosa

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Admired the pretty tannery sheds in Bosa.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Loved every pink on the walls.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Travelled along the coast road to Alghero and had lunch along the ramparts.

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

Wearing: Club Monaco Dress, J Crew bag and sandals

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.com

The perfect seas in San Teodoro (but the crowds were horrendous!)

Geneva's guide to beautiful Sardinia www.apairandasparediy.comDidn’t want to leave but had to.

HOW TO: PACK A HAT IN YOUR SUITCASE

Recently I’ve started collecting hats the way that other people collect shoes, to me they’re the ultimate accessory, particularly when travelling – nothing dresses up a simple outfit like a panama or straw hat. I took not one but three to Thailand recently and have to say they became my constant companion.

One of the biggest issues when travelling with a hat is how you actually transport the thing without it a) ending up looking like a flat crushed pancake if you just throw it in your suitcase or b) annoying you constantly if you take it as carry on or c) getting left behind at airport security. After a fair bit of trial and error I’ve come up with one way to get around the whole ‘do they still sell hat boxes’ conundrum. Read on to see how I go about it.

Packing a hat in your suitcase www.apairandasparediy.com

Wearing: Eugenia Kim Hat, One Teaspoon Shorts, Club Monaco shirt,  J Crew Bag and flats, Daniel Wellington Watch

Packing a hat in your suitcase www.apairandasparediy.com

How to:

1. First, get together all the clothes you want to pack. Then, pack all your heavy items at the bottom of your bag including shoes, bags and heavier fabrics like denims. Make sure when you lay out the heavier clothes on top of your accessories that you do so to create a nice flat surface.

2. Next, take a nice heavy piece of clothing like a denim shirt and fold then roll it up.

3. Taking your hat, push the shirt down carefully into the crown (the part where your head goes), making sure it fills completely. If there’s still space, add another item of clothing so the crown part is completely stuffed.

4. Next, lay your hat upright onto the flat surface of clothing. Then start adding your remaining items of clothing around the hat. For me that meant adding pieces of my holiday wardrobe like this skirt (perfect holiday wear), this romper and this bikini (like this).

5. Pack all your items around the hat, making sure you pack it all nice a tight so the hat can’t flop around. Once you’ve done that add some more clothes on top so it’s nice a flat. Now just zip up your bag and away you go!

One tip from my return journey from Thailand – this technique works best if you don’t stuff your suitcase full, because if you do it’s pretty hard to prevent your precious hat being squashed. In those situations (the ones where you’ve bought so much and have to sit on your suitcase to get it closed) the only real option is to wear your hat on the plane.

Packing a hat in your suitcase www.apairandasparediy.com

Wearing: Eugenia Kim Hat, One Teaspoon Shorts, Club Monaco shirt,  J Crew Bag and flats, Daniel Wellington Watch

Packing a hat in your suitcase www.apairandasparediy.comPacking a hat in your suitcase www.apairandasparediy.comPacking a hat in your suitcase www.apairandasparediy.comPacking a hat in your suitcase www.apairandasparediy.com

You’ll notice I kept my wardrobe fairly co-ordinated in a colour palette sense when I was packing for Thailand, in an effort to stick with the principles of this (very old) post. Always helps to keep things simple!

GLASTONBURY PHOTO DIARY

As I mentioned a few days ago, the whole ‘fingers crossed it doesn’t rain’ business didn’t even slightly work this year at Glastonbury – it’s the first time in my five festivals that it’s rained so hard that your skin actually hurts through your raincoat. Needless to say wellies were a must – oh how I alternately loved, and then hated, my little red hunters. Oh and did I mention there was thunderstorm and they had to close the stages for a couple of hours on the Friday afternoon? Luckily my attitude was that it allowed more time for hitting the organic felafel stand! Another upside of the mayhem was that stage times were a bit out of wack and we ended up seeing Polica in a tent with about 20 other people. THE moment of the festival. Oh and I didn’t let the mud stop me wearing my new DIY kimono (in action here and here)! The lovely team over at Free People asked me to share my favourite bits of the festival, so feel free to head over to their blog here to hear more (including my favourite acts) and see the rest of my pics.

Glasto pics

Wearing: Free People romper, J Crew Jacket & Hat, Hunter wellies

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There were times when the weather, and weight of the mud on my boots, got so bad that it had me thinking I may have to end my annual pilgrimage to the somerset countryside (a big commitment when you live in Hong Kong), but on looking back, I can only remember the good bits and am already planning next year!