wander and hunt ad 2

How-To

DIY SPRING FLORAL HEADPIECE

I have to admit to hair being my last priority when it comes to getting ready. One reason for this is no doubt the crazy humidity in Hong Kong which turns your hair into a Fran Drescher style bouffant within a minute of leaving the house, which leads me to generally adopt  the hair-in-a-bun-with-lethal-amounts-of-hairspray situation. Although 90% of the time this works for me (particularly when I’m just hanging in the studio), there are times when it’s nice to do something a little bit special, which is where this amazing floral headband Gemma and I created comes in. Surprisingly easy and not requiring all that many flowers, it’s the perfect accessory for a Spring picnic, or for when you’re hosting a party and have flowers on hand (or even better, for the day after when you need a little bit of sunshine in your life).

Make a spring floral headpiece www.apairandasparediy.com

You need:

  • A bunch of florals – Gemma suggests picking a few round full blooms like roses or ranunculus and and a few longer ones and then a few smaller finer flowers as filler. This will help you create lots of colour and texture in your piece.
  • Floral wire
  • Scissors (I love these bonsai ones)
  • Bobby pins

Make a floral headpiece www.apairandasparediy.com

How to:

1. Start by snipping your flowers down to about 5cm (2 inch) long stalks.

Make a floral headpiece www.apairandasparediy.com

2. Do that for all of your flowers.

Make a floral headpiece www.apairandasparediy.com

3. To begin, start by wiring together two flowers along the stalks.

Make a floral headpiece www.apairandasparediy.com

4. Keep wiring them together, alternating the different flower types so that you have lots of texture, differing colours and no gaps.

Make a floral headpiece www.apairandasparediy.com

5. Rather than creating a simple string of flowers, we started with one strand and then thickened the headpiece out by adding more flowers in width to create a more dramatic headpiece shape. Having said that, you can create whatever shape you want for this style.

Make a floral headpiece www.apairandasparediy.com

6. To check whether the length is right as you start adding more, hold it up o your head to decide how many flowers to add – we decided to do mine on the one side of my head but you can all the way around if you like – it’s really up to you!

Make a floral headpiece www.apairandasparediy.com

7. I then created a very simple up do using pins (kinda similar to this) and then pinned the headpiece in. So easy!

Make a spring floral headpiece www.apairandasparediy.com

What I’ve learnt from Gemma is that floral wire can be used for soooo many fun projects, this is clearly just the beginning.

Stay tuned for more floral collaborations with Gemma and I (I love having her in the office because she always leaves so many nice florals!)

HOW TO: SPRING FLOWERING BULBS

When I lived in London Spring was, without a doubt, my favourite time of year. The air would change, you could literally smell the new season, and you would start to see flowering bulbs pushing through the grass  (and know/hope that the days would get longer and your severe case of SAD might diminish). That real sense of seasonal change is something I miss a bit here in Hong Kong, where going from 60% humidity to 97% humidity pretty much only excites your sweat glands.

A couple of months ago Gemma (another ex-Londoner) and I were reminiscing about the glory of Springtime in a cold climate, and she told me it’s actually possible to grow Spring flowering blooms in Hong Kong.  Prior to our little project I had no idea just how much of a science there is to growing bulbs at home, and was very interested as to how she did with with no garden and all but a few small pots. Full disclosure – it’s the cheat version of growing bulbs, but when she delivered them to our office – I wasn’t feeling picky!

Flowering Spring bulbs

For those brown thumbs out there (like me), flowering bulbs like these Hyacinths require a long period of chilling, usually around 11 – 14 weeks in the frozen ground, but because Hong Kong’s Winter are mild most of the time, Gemma bought pre-chilled bulbs at the flower markets. These had apparently been put in the fridge in a process called ‘forcing’, where they cool the bulb to simulate the Winter period and then warm – or plant if you live in a warm place like Hong Kong – to simulate Spring.

If you live in a cold climate and are organised enough, you can plant bulbs in the garden in Autumn and let the cooling period happen as nature intended, but we did it the easy (aka lazy) way!

You need:

  • Bulbs (Gemma used pre-chilled hyacinth bulbs)
  • Soil
  • Three small pots

Flowering Spring bulbs

How to:

1. Pre chilled bulbs should have roots sprouting as these things develop during the cooling period. Plant the bulb roots down in the soil with 2.5cm (1 in) of the sprouts sitting out of the soil.

Flowering Spring bulbs

2. Gemma then left hers in the warm kitchen until the leaves had fully grown, which took about 3 weeks. They should then look like the below once the (here’s some we prepared earlier):

Flowering Spring bulbsFlowering Spring bulbs

How cute are the diptyque candles as pots?

Flowering Spring bulbs

3.  Once she could see the bloom buds coming through, she put then in a sunny spot in her living room so the flowers would bloom. Apparently once the flowers come out it’s best to take them out of the sun so you get a while out of them. These hyacinths smell so good!

Flowering Spring bulbs

HOW TO: CARE FOR LEATHER

The last few weeks has been one of many firsts for me – first studio space, first snake soup (yes, really), and first time wearing leather pants. Although most of you will probably have dabbled in leather trouser territory, Hong Kong weather isn’t generally conducive to any sort of animal skin encasing on the legs, which has meant I’ve not had the chance. But the weather has been uncharacteristically cool, and the bare concrete floors in our office aid in that chilliness, which has allowed me to experiment with cold(ish) weather clothes. Let’s just say I’m a fan! Who doesn’t love feeling all slippery like Mick Jagger on any random Tuesday? Although, mental note, must remember to check the temperatures before donning in the morning – knowing me I’ll have one of those awkward, sweaty legged, moments on an uncharacteristically warm March day.

On the subject of leather, I recently got together with Witchery to create a guide to caring for your leather handbag – perfect for keeping that beloved tote in tip top shape from the moment you buy it til, well, forever – because that’s how long a leather bag should last.

Read my how-to post here.

Caring from your leather bag www.apairandasparediy.com
Caring from your leather bag www.apairandasparediy.com

These are my favourite new leather pants – they’ve got a touch of stretch in them so they’re super comfy!

Caring from your leather bag www.apairandasparediy.comCaring from your leather bag www.apairandasparediy.com

Outfit details here.

Caring from your leather bag www.apairandasparediy.comCaring from your leather bag www.apairandasparediy.com