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Chinese New Year in Hong Kong (Visiting The Flower Markets!)

Travel Guides Jan 30, 2017

Happy Lunar New Year guys! I’m back in Hong Kong just in time to ring in the year of the rooster, perfect timing I have to say. Chinese new year in Hong Kong is one of my favourite times to be in the city.

Why? Everyone is just so happy, the streets are filled with colour and chaos in the lead up and then, like magic, a quiet and calmness descends for the four days of the new year’s celebrations, when (much like Christmas) people stay indoors with their families. Shops are closed and some – that don’t have mailboxes because they’re always open – put temporary mailboxes on their shuttered doors. It really is very sweet. I wanted to share some of the beauty with you, in collaboration with my friends over at Grana who have some lovely pieces to celebrate the new year!

 

Wearing: Grana silk dress in rio red (grab 10% off with the code apasxgrana), Zara boots, market bag, vintage belt.

Chinese New Year in Hong Kong – the flower markets

One of my absolute favourite things to do in Hong Kong around Chinese New Year is visit the Lunar Markets, set up in parks specifically to cater to all the decorating that’s required to ring in the new year – flowers symbolize rebirth and new growth and so they play a huge part in the decorating. The markets are, therefore, a dream, overflowing with flowers and plants all chosen specifically to bring good luck.

These markets are a must if you’re visiting Hong Kong, and they usually run for around 2 weeks prior to New Year itself. There are two main ones – Victoria Park in Causeway Bay, and Fa Hui Park in Prince Edward. I prefer the latter, mainly because it’s a little less busy than the Causeway Bay ones, and located just around the corner from the main flower markets, meaning you can do both at once. Kit and I went a few days ago and couldn’t get over the beauty of the orchid stalls, rows and rows of bright flowers, apparently flown in straight from Taiwan. It was stunning!

Because red is such an auspicious colour,  I was excited to wear this silk dress that I got from Grana a little while back – to get in the holiday spirit. Although I thought it might be too cold – the weather has turned warm and humid, meaning silk was perfect. Grana recently got in store a shorter version of this dress in a few new colours, perfect for Spring!

My Favourite Chinese New Year Plants

There are so many types of plants at the lunar flower markets, and many of them have one thing in common – rather than being cut they grow and flower, whether it be in water or planted. Having them bud and grow in your house is a strong symbol of new life.

You’ll notice a lot of the symbolism relates to good luck and new beginnings and although I’m more a believer in making your own luck, a little extra, and that all important  fresh start/clean slate, couldn’t hurt right?

 

 

This post is in collaboration with Grana. Grab 10% off using the code ‘apasxgrana’. Photos by Kit Lee.
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